Blackened Seasoning

$8.00Price

Looking for some Cajun Blackened heat and seasoning? Blackening produces a black, peppery crust, which sears in all the flavor and juices, making it a great choice for the grill. The spices used are commonly referred to as blackened spice or blackening seasoning. Many people mistakenly believe that blackening is a classic Cajun technique or recipe, like jambalaya, gumbo or etouffee, but that is not accurate. Chef Paul Prudhome of K-Paul's in New Orleans created and perfected the blackening process, which was originally meant as a fish recipe. Today blackening seasoning is used to treat all kinds of food, including shrimp, steak, chicken, pork and even vegetables. The blackening does not come from the spices but from the butter charring in the pan. The butter will char as soon as it hits the pan, creating the seared crust that keeps the meat or vegetables from drying out. If you do decide to blacken you should use a solid cast-iron skillet as any other pan might create a hazard or be ruined by leaving it on such high heat with nothing in it. To seal in the juices of the meat by forming a spicy crust you need to use lots of heat, which produces lots of smoke, this is where home chefs typically falter as they stop short of perfecting this cooking method as smoke fills the kitchen (and the smoke detector is probably going off, the dogs barking and the kids are looking for the fire extinguisher). You don't have to blacken to enjoy so don’t be intimidated. Because of this many home chefs place their iron skillet on the grill with the heat on high for at least 30 minutes. The skillet gets very hot but not white hot. Here are a couple of tips: Keep your food cool as butter or oil sticks better Keep your filets about ½" thick.   Make enough butter and spice mixture to evenly coat all your fillets Dredge your meat in the butter and spices and place immediately into the hot skillet For best results use 1-2 tablespoons of blacken seasoning per cup of butter Hand blended from Hungarian paprika, Mexican oregano, yellow mustard, garlic powder, black pepper, cumin, onion, thyme, cayenne pepper, celery seeds and bay leaves.